Book Launch: CPS Faculty Rashid Khalidi in Conversation with Dr. Seth Anziska

Book Launch: CPS Faculty Rashid Khalidi in Conversation with Dr. Seth Anziska

Book Launch: Preventing Palestine: A Political History from Camp David to Oslo

Dr. Seth Anziska (University College London) in conversation with CPS Faculty Prof. Rashid Khalidi (Department of History, Columbia University).

Thursday, September 20th, at 5PM
Deutsches Haus

420 West 116th Street
New York, NY 10027

Based on newly declassified international sources, Preventing Palestine charts the emergence of the Middle East peace process, including the establishment of a separate track to deal with the issue of Palestine.

Nayrouz Abu Hatoum is the 2018-19 Ibrahim Abu Lughod Fellow

Nayrouz Abu Hatoum is the 2018-19 Ibrahim Abu Lughod Fellow

CPS is happy to announce that the 2018-19 Abu Lughod fellow is Nayrouz Abu Hatoum. Nayrouz obtained her PhD in Social Anthropology from York University, Toronto, where she currently is a Visiting Scholar working on theories in visual anthropology, urban politics, landscape, borders and state violence. Her research explores visual politics in Palestine and the Israeli state, and people’s place making and dwelling practices in a context of colonialism and military occupations. At CPS, she will be working on her book project titled “Visual Decolonization: Photography of Militarized Landscapes in Palestine.”

Palestine Open Maps

Palestine Open Maps

CPS Faculty Nora Akawi collaborated with the newly launched Palestine Open Maps, an open platform for map-based exploration and immersive storytelling. This alpha version of the platform allows users to navigate and search the historic map sheets, and to view basic data about present and erased localities.

Rashid Khalidi wins WOCMES Seville 2018 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Middle Eastern Studies

Rashid Khalidi wins WOCMES Seville 2018 Award for Outstanding Contributions to Middle Eastern Studies

CPS Co-Director Rashid Khalidi, one of the leading academics in the study of the 20th century Palestinian national movement, will receive the 5th WOCMES Award on Wednesday 18th of July 2018.

Every four years, coinciding with a new edition of the congress, WOCMES International Advisory Council highlights the prominent trajectory of an outstanding expert for his/her contribution to Middle Eastern Studies. In this occasion, the Council endorsed the candidacy of Dr. Rashid Khalidi, Edward Said Professor of Arab Studies at Columbia University and one of the most brilliant scholars of our days.

Khalidi is the highest authority on interpretations of the Arab-Jewish and Israeli-Palestinian conflicts, and author of some of the most influential studies on the topic. His public role as a prominent voice of the Palestinian cause is globally recognized and valued. It is impossible to understand this region and its historical experiences without Khalidi’s works.

Salim Tamari receives the State of Palestine National Recognition Award

Salim Tamari receives the State of Palestine National Recognition Award

Salim Tamari, Editor of Jerusalem Quarterly and Professor of Sociology at Birzeit University, received the State of Palestine National Recognition Award for his collective body of work. Established by presidential decree, the award is the highest honor in the fields of literature, political science, and the arts. It was announced in conjunction with the annual Palestine International Book Fair, held by the Palestinian Ministry of Culture.

"The Palestinians Have Not Forgotten, They Have Not Gone Away"

"The Palestinians Have Not Forgotten, They Have Not Gone Away"

CPS Faculty and former Co-Director Rashid Khalidi writes for The Nation on Palestine seventy years after the Nakba.

“The natives are still there, unified by decades of occupation and colonization since 1967, and they are restless. Those Palestinians who have managed to remain in historical Palestine—in spite of the ceaseless efforts to dispossess them—continue to resist erasure. Outside of Palestine, an equal number remain profoundly attached to their homeland and to the right of return. The Palestinians have not forgotten, they have not gone away, and the memory of Palestine and its dismemberment has not been effaced. Indeed, wider international audiences are increasingly aware of these realities.”

April 26 | Talk: Laleh Khalili and Malcolm Gladwell for the Uprising 13/13 Seminar Series

April 26 | Talk: Laleh Khalili and Malcolm Gladwell for the Uprising 13/13 Seminar Series

The final Uprising 13/13 seminar will address how to think about counterrevolutions in relation to all the other modalities of revolt and resistance that we have studied this year (civil disobedience, #BLM, breaking silence, Standing Rock, etc.). How do we talk about the counterrevolutions as a distinct form of uprising?

With Malcolm Gladwell, author; Bernard E. Harcourt, Columbia University; Laleh Khalili, Centre for Palestine Studies, SOAS, University of London; Massimiliano Tomba, University of California Santa Cruz.
Moderated by Jeremy Kessler and Emmanuelle Saada.

The seminar will be streamed live here; also posted now is a reading guide by Emily Gruber to The Counterrevolution. Essays "The Aftermath" by Laleh Khalili, "The Paris Commune and the Poetry of the Unknown" by Massimiliano Tomba, and "How Our Government Became Maoist: The Paradoxical Legacy of May '68" are all posted here in advance of the seminar.

April 26, 2018 from 6:15 p.m. to 8:45 p.m.
Riverside Church Assembly Hall
490 Riverside Drive New York, NY 10027

April 16 | Film Screening: 3000 Nights, by Mai Masri

April 16 | Film Screening: 3000 Nights, by Mai Masri

Mai Masri will screen her award-winning film 3000 Nights at the New School on Monday April 16 at 6:30pm. More details here, and RSVP here.

Selected to represent Jordan at the Academy Award for Best Foreign Language Film and Palestine at the Golden Globes, 3000 Nights received its New York premiere at the Center for Palestine Studies in 2016.

3000 Nights tells the story of a newlywed Palestinian schoolteacher who is falsely arrested and incarcerated in an Israeli prison where she gives birth to her child. Inspired by a true story and shot in a real prison, the film traces a young mother's journey of hope, resilience and survival against all odds.