Dec
5
3:00 PM15:00

Palestine & Law: The State Question

This first session brings together leading legal scholars Susan Akram, Jamil Dakwar, and Nimer Sultany to address "The State Question." While taking account of recent developments at the United Nations, the discussion will range into wider issues connected with the history and current determinants of Palestinian state forms.

Future topics for CPS public events on "Palestine & Law" will include property issues, from possession to dispossession; the sphere of litigation; the legal status of the refugee; and regimes of imprisonment.

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Nov
14
6:30 PM18:30

Debunking the Myth of Israeli Democracy

Jamal Zahalka, Member of the Israeli Knesset, will discuss the myth of Israeli democracy.

Moderated by Professor Bashir Abu-Manneh.

Jamal Zahalka, has been a member of the Israeli parliament, the Knesset, since 2003. He is a member of different committees in the Knesset that address education, culture, sports, local government and economic affairs. He is the head of the National Democratic Assembly, a party representing the Palestinians citizens of Israel. He holds a PhD in pharmaceutical studies from the Hebrew University in Jerusalem.

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Oct
20
7:30 PM19:30

Israeli Impunity and International Law: A Talk with Richard Falk

Richard Falk, United Nations Special Rapporteur on Palestinian human rights, will discuss the Israeli pattern of flagrant defiance of international law, as sustained by American geopolitical leverage inside the UN and beyond. 

This talk will be moderated by Bashir Abu-Manneh, Assistant Professor of Literature at Barnard College.

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Oct
14
to Oct 15

Injured Cities: Urban Afterlives

What enduring wounds does catastrophe leave on urban life, and how can they be mobilized and transformed in the aftermath of injury to enable the imagination of new modes of social life and to thwart impending forms of social death?

This conference, convened on the tenth anniversary of the events of September 11, 2001, aims to explore the effects of catastrophe on cities and their inhabitants, to analyze the politics of shock and terror states use in response to their vulnerability, and to imagine more life-affirming modes of redress and re-invention.

New York City provides a significant and indeed singularly relevant locus for this event. A city of immigrants, many of whom have ties to other cities that have suffered catastrophe, New York's intellectuals and cultural producers, as well as its ordinary citizens, have a unique contribution to offer to the many urgent projects of reimagining cities around the world today.

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